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Chuck Jones at the Museum of the Moving Image

Photograph and drawings courtesy Chuck Jones Center for Creativity. Film stills courtesy Warner Bros.™ Looney Tunes Characters © & TM Warner Bros.

Photograph and drawings courtesy Chuck Jones Center for Creativity. Film stills courtesy Warner Bros.™ Looney Tunes Characters © & TM Warner Bros.

Now through January 2015, the Museum of the Moving Image here in New York City is presenting an exhibition featuring the art of animator Chuck Jones. If the name Chuck Jones is unfamiliar, then the names of the characters he animated will probably ring a bell. He is most well known for bringing classic Warner Brothers characters such as Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck to life. And for the much younger generations, he created the Road Runner character — which has been the mascot of the Time Warner Cable company’s internet services — among many other beloved animated creatures. Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: The Hunt For Red October (1990)

Earlier this year, Chris Pine became the fourth actor to play the role of Jack Ryan, a fictional CIA agent made popular by author Tom Clancy during the 1980′s and 90′s. The series has slowly grown, adding its fifth installment dating all the way back to 1990. While each film can act as a stand alone story, true fans know where the timeline began. In the film universe it began in 1990 with The Hunt For Red OctoberContinue reading

Did You Know: Sean Connery

He was the first international action star, the first heart-throb of the sixties and one of the most debonair individuals in the history of cinema. Sean Connery is a legend whose career spans over four decades and countless films. Despite all you may think you know about the original James Bond, there are few obscure facts that may come as a complete surprise to his casual fans.  Continue reading

Mobile Phone Filmmaking

Film Still from short film Tom & Issy

Film Still from short film Tom & Issy

Filmmaking has become more and more accessible in recent years. We all know that you no longer need to carry around a large film-eating camera, whose film then needs to get specially developed, to get some decent footage. But what you might not know is that you most likely have its equivalent in your pocket right now. Mobile phones, while ubiquitous for vertical video of pets and babies alike, have become a vehicle for independent filmmakers looking to explore the medium on a budget. Continue reading

What to Watch: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1

image via moviepilot.com

image via moviepilot.com

Jennifer Lawrence has been a part of two of the biggest movie franchises of the last decade. The first is Fox Studios’ rebirth of the X-Men franchise where Lawrence has played the role of Mystique. Her role has grown from a relatively small one into the franchise’s key character. The second successful series to include Jennifer Lawrence is the one that broke her into mainstream success, The Hunger Games. This Friday will begin the last chapter of the series as The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 opens in theaters nationwide.  Continue reading

Celebrate at the MoMA

Postcard of Heckscher Building (where MoMA originally rented space), with The Plaza Hotel (right), 1923 via MoMA.org

Postcard of Heckscher Building (where MoMA originally rented space), with The Plaza Hotel (right), 1923 via MoMA.org

If you are in NYC this weekend, you might want to stop by the MoMA and wish it a happy birthday! The Museum of Modern Art is hosting an event the evening of November 15th in honor of its 85th anniversary.

The MoMA was born in the shadow of the infamous Wall Street Crash of 1929. Abby Aldrich Rockefeller and her friends opened the museum which was the first of its kind in Manhattan. The museum quickly expanded under the leadership of president A. Conger Goodyear, eventually outgrowing the several rooms it occupied on the corner of 57th Street and Fifth Avenue. Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: Shoot the Piano Player (1960)

When you think about French New Wave a number of movies quickly come to mind. Breathless and 400 Blows are the most popular films, especially when looking to introduce someone to the movement that shaped the aesthetic of filmmakers like Quentin Tarantino and Wes Anderson. One film that gets lost in the shuffle is the genre bending Shoot the Piano PlayerContinue reading

Did You Know: Jim Carrey

image via movieplot.com

image via movieplot.com

The famed comedian Jim Carrey hasn’t been as busy over the past ten years as he was in the 90′s but that hasn’t diminished his place among the genre’s elite. In fact, he returns to the big screen to revive one of his most famous roles as Lloyd Christmas in Dumb and Dumber To. Here are some of the lesser known facts about Carrey’s multi-decade spanning career.  Continue reading

A Doc for What Ails You

If you are in New York City this November, you may want to consider DOC NYC. In just four years of existence, DOC NYC has emerged as one of New York City’s premiere documentary film festivals. Festival films will screen at the IFC Center in the West Village and also at locations in Chelsea (SVA Theater and Bow Tie Chelsea Cinemas) beginning November 13th.

DOC NYC Festival Logo

DOC NYC Festival Logo via docnyc.net

The festival website currently includes a long list of the films that will be screening. Without further ado, here are a few of the films I’m most excited about: Continue reading

What to Watch: Rosewater

image via geekmundo.net

image via geekmundo.net

Jon Stewart has been called many things: writer, comedian, actor, political satirist but there will be a new title he can add to that list after Friday. Rosewater will make Jon Stewart a film director. Based on a memoir by Maziar Bahari, Rosewater follows the one hundred and eighteen day imprisonment of Bahari himself, a Canadian journalist, in Iran. What separates this film from others like it is the personal attachment the story has to both Bahari and Stewart.  Continue reading