« More of "write-ups" »

Highlighting Women’s Cinema at MoMA

Portrait of Alice Guy Blaché via Filmmaker Magazine

Portrait of Alice Guy Blaché via Filmmaker Magazine

As I’ve already written about before, while women are so prominently featured in front of the camera, the roles are still very sparse behind the camera. That said, the amazing work that has been produced by those women directors who manage to break through deserves to be upheld for future generations. In direct response to this need for preservation, the Women’s Film Preservation Fund (WFPF) was started. The WFPF was created by New York City’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) and the New York Women in Film and Television (NYWIFT) in 1995 and remains the only program with a focus on the legacy of women in the industry.  Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: Elena and Her Men (1956)

Ingrid Bergman’s talent knew no borders as she ventured into her most memorable French role in Jean Renoir’s satirical comedy Elena and Her Men. This 1956 film pulled inspiration from the theater, Hollywood’s Golden Age as well as French history itself. Lead character Elena Sokorowska (Bergman) plays a bankrupt woman who is looking for her latest husband. Despite this money-seeking introduction, she has an inherent ability to provide extreme luck for anyone she encounters through her daisies. She also manages to intoxicate the men around her, leading to quite a conventional romantic comedy for the time period.  Continue reading

Did You Know: Ingrid Bergman

image via hdwallpaper.com

image via hdwallpaper.com

There is a massive amount of hyperbole that is thrown towards the Golden Era of Hollywood between 1930 and 1959. Within those years, cinema fans saw a carousel of superstars but none that shined brighter than the multi-talented Swedish sensation Ingrid Bergman. Active in the business for nearly fifty years, Bergman transcended cinematic borders with hit films in the United States, Italy, France and Sweden. As with most historically artistic figures, some stories will stand out over the others. Here are a few that are hopefully new to you (the reader) and maybe shed some light on the person behind the stardom.  Continue reading

What to Watch: Project Almanac

image via imdb.com

image via imdb.com

Time travel has been a topic broached by film since the dawn of the medium. This Friday, Project Almanac hopes to take that basic concept used over the decades and mix it with the found-footage idea that has seen a slowdown in recent years. With a relatively unknown cast and an unproven director, Project Almanac is hoping to peak interest with younger audiences through its high octane trailers and association with MTV Films. Despite seeing stiff competition from the likes of Kevin Costner’s latest release, Project Almanac will see a wider theater release than any other feature this coming week. Continue reading

The Orson Welles Centennial

Photo Credit: Courtesy of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences via The Film Stage

Photo Credit: Courtesy of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences via The Film Stage

Legendary filmmaker Orson Welles would have been 100 years old this year. George Orson Welles, who died in 1985, was a prolific actor, director, writer and producer. He was able to work across various arts mediums as he excelled on the radio as well as in stage and screen. Welles is often revered as one of the greatest directors of all time and his film Citizen Kane is repeatedly in top 10 lists of the greatest films of all time. The film is regarded as one that pushed the medium forward, introducing different types of camera angles, new lighting techniques and sound design that Welles borrowed from his radio days. Citizen Kane is also impressive due to how many “hats” Welles wore during the production — in addition to starring as the lead, he also wrote, directed and produced the film!  Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: The Whole Nine Yards (2000)

image via sky.com

image via sky.com

In the year 2000, all of the elements for a perfect comedic storm came together in order to make The Whole Nine Yards — one of the most successful films of the year. Made on a budget of $34 million, Jonathan Lynn’s gangster comedy pulled in over $100 million despite not being as critically acclaimed as originally expected. The cast was also quite a sight to behold as Hollywood stars meshed with current television headliners. Bruce Willis, Matthew Perry, Michael Clarke Duncan, Amanda Peet and Kevin Pollack shared the screen in scenarios very much out of their usual comfort zone. It may have fallen into obscurity over the years but The Whole Nine Yards still holds up as a fun comedy that brought more than a few firsts for the business.  Continue reading

Did You Know: Bruce Willis

Lt. John McClane, Korben Dallas, Butch Coolidge and Harry Stamper are just a few of the characters Bruce Willis has played on screen. Known for his over-the-top action films like Die Hard and The Fifth Element, Willis has quietly garnered a decorated and diverse career while not shying away from risk. Hollywood is sometimes known for its stars being somewhat safe when it comes to selecting roles but Willis has defied convention and, for better or for worse, taken on some very challenging jobs. Still, there is an air of mystery surrounding Willis. Many things are unclear about his career and even his tastes. Here we will hopefully shed some light on one of the more charismatic actors of the past thirty years.  Continue reading

The Evolution of the Critic

Image via Misft Minded

Image via Misft Minded

Most people believe in the concept of criticism, especially in the arts. In all art forms, critique is necessary; it infers that critical thinking has occurred on the part of the observer. And, as we’ve seen now with comments sections on websites, people are more than willing to share their thoughts. However, there is a problem with this model — with the noise of all these varied opinions, it can be hard to get a signal and make sense of the art around us. To solve this problem, we have critics who provide their opinions, which weigh more than the average person’s due to the breadth of knowledge the critic may have for a given topic and that critic’s established status as a tastemaker.  Continue reading

Celebrating the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr in NYC

Image via BAM.org

Image via BAM.org

Monday is a national holiday that celebrates the life of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. King’s legacy includes many poignant acts of civil disobedience and non-violent protest that are very important to hold up as an example given the disparities in race and class that our society continues to struggle with today.  Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: Move Over, Darling (1963)

Yesterday we covered a few things you may not have known about Doris Day. Today, we dedicate Throwback Thursday to one of her more successful films of 1963 Move Over, Darling. Not only did the film prove just how big of a star Doris Day was, but it also helped 20th Century Fox out of a financial hole created by the money pit that was Elizabeth Taylor’s Cleopatra. The original budget for the Egyptian drama was set at $2 million but ballooned to $31 million and nearly bankrupted the entire company. Luckily, Move Over, Darling, which also was over-budget, more than made up for the studio’s mistakes in 1963.  Continue reading