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Dazed and Confused Film Still (1993)

Dazed and Confused Film Still (1993)

Richard Linklater’s Dazed and Confused is perhaps one of the most referenced films about high school even though it was set nearly forty years ago in the summer of ’76. While set in the seventies, it was filmed in the 90′s and just celebrated its twentieth anniversary last year. Continue reading

Throwback Thursday Review: The Exorcist (1973)

No horror film has a bigger or badder reputation to mainstream audiences than the 1973 William Friedkin film The Exorcist. Other films may have more gore and even a more solid plot but it is rare to see a horror film have such an iconic and long lasting legacy as this one. Even by today’s lofty special effects standards, The Exorcist holds up well, providing the same jumps and visceral responses as anything released in 2014. Continue reading

Did You Know: The Halloween Movies

image via toobjects.com

image via toobjects.com

The Halloween movies can be credited for kickstarting the slasher film genre in the United States but there are a lot of interesting tidbits of which many fans are unaware. The franchise has had ten installments and each one has provided its own unique stories. Here are a few of the more memorable facts that you may not know about the series.  Continue reading

Objectivity and Editing

screenshot from All We Left Behind

film still from our upcoming project All We Left Behind

Recently, I was watching Project Runway (one of my favorite television shows) with some friends and one of my friends mentioned that a designer was great but “she couldn’t edit” her own work. And the program itself, which is now running at an hour and 30 minutes, arguably could use some more editing to fit into a more manageable 60 minute chunk (of course, there are probably a number of ratings-related reasons why it instead runs 90 minutes).

As we work on editing our latest film, this got me thinking about the tough choices that creative folks in any industry must face. Continue reading

What’s Out There: Ouija is Really a Movie and It’s Here!

image via screenrant.com

image via screenrant.com

Of all the movies being released in theaters this coming Friday one of them stands out as having the chance to make horrible movie history. That movie is the cinematic embodiment of one of the most disappointing board games to ever make its way into households across America. I’m talking about the Ouija board. You may be asking yourself what could have possessed producers to pursue such a mind-numbingly idiotic idea? Well, here are some things you may not know about October’s sleeper horror fiasco.  Continue reading

The New York Times Magazine in Photographs

Gregory Crewdson, Julianne Moore, from “Dream House,” 2002.

Gregory Crewdson, Julianne Moore, from “Dream House,” 2002.

While the New York Times is well known as the largest metropolitan newspaper in the United States, its Sunday supplement, the New York Times Magazine, is widely known for its photography. This photography is currently the subject of an exhibition at the Aperture Gallery in New York City. Continue reading

What’s Out There: Guns, Weird Superheros and Psychos

image via movieplot.com

Image via movieplot.com

This Friday will see an eclectic, if not strange, grouping of movies to hit the big screen. Many of them may feel like regurgitated ideas put out to make a quick buck. Fortunately, the usual topics of war, crime-fighting and serial murderers are there for mass consumption. But before you venture into your cushy seats with a tub of popcorn, there are a few interesting facts you might want to know about this week’s slew of releases.  Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: A Lifetime in Front of the Camera

This week’s Throwback Thursday topic started all the way back in 1956. A forty-year-old Eli Wallach, yes forty, made his film debut in one of the more controversial films of the year. Baby Doll saw this well established stage actor try something new by becoming the sexually suggestive Silva Vacarro. While instructed not to outwardly seduce costar Carroll Baker, the player’s suave moves couldn’t be held from the imagination of audiences. Director Elia Kazan couldn’t have been happier with the outcome as his cinematic journey through the power of seduction worked effortlessly through Eli’s skills.  Continue reading

Throwback Thursday: The Memorable Influence Lupe Vélez

Photo from The Red List

Photo from The Red List

The history of cinema is littered with forgotten artists whose inventiveness was later perfected by the megastars that followed them. Lupe Vélez is a perfect example of this. Known for her “Mexican Spitfire” character, Lupe was one of the earliest representations of Latin-American women in the talkie era of Hollywood. Born into a military family in Mexico, Vélez was forced to take life into her own hands at an early age. After the disappearance of her father during the Mexican Revolution, she was forced to move her family to Mexico City and work as a warehouse clerk for four dollars a week. Her aggressive personality was always her standout feature, but it was on the big screen and stage where it became her trademark.  Continue reading

Four (Sometimes Embarrassing) Tales of Godzilla

Godzilla Poster

via Godzillamovie.com

On May 16th, the unstoppable rubber (now computer generated) monster Godzilla once again will rampage through the streets of some helpless city for our entertainment. Director Gareth Edwards (Monsters) appears to have done a fantastic job at creating the aura and gargantuine feeling associated with a movie befitting of the King of Monsters. The history of Godzilla is one that spans six decades. Some of that history has become cinematic folklore. Other aspects could definitely be appreciated for it’s unintentional comedic value.  Continue reading